a different view of the West ….

This is my 3rd post on the Glen Rose, TX 4th of July Parade and I wanted to highlight a few of the special moments I captured. How American is this that one of the lead vehicles his an old John Deere tractor? We see the crowds waiting in front of the Courthouse, friends gathering on the square, then a gentleman in a World War I uniform followed by the American Legion Post Color Guard (my friend Daryl Best is pictured), Uncle Sam and then another Uncle Sam and Lady Liberty in a float pulled by an old soldier and I am going to assume that he is wearing part of his original Army uniform (something I can admire because I have not been able to get into my Dress Blues in several decades). All in all, this is one of the better parades I have been to in years.

Leave a comment

Here are more photos of the kids enjoying (or sleeping though) the Glen Rose 4th of July Parade. Lots of them were in groups watching as the parade went by because the people on the floats were tossing candy to the crowd so there was always a scramble as to who could get the best pieces. The local Fire Department brought up the rear of the parade with their spray nozzles pointed at the ground only to see several young men (showing off for the girls) getting their hair washed!

Leave a comment

Glen Rose, TX holds a very typically “small town” Fourth of July Parade every year and considering how hot is was this year, they decided to hold it early in the day which made for large crowds, especially children. I focused mostly on the kids who seems to have a really big day and from what I saw, thoroughly enjoyed themselves. In this group of photos I found a very sheik young lady in a straw hat, two fathers holding their little girls, one very attentive dog, a flag waver, tow little boys who were watching the moon set over the courthouse and the little girl with an interesting statement on her t-shirt. More kids in Part 2.

Leave a comment

scottgipsonphoto-1337While driving through West Texas last week between Lubbock and Abilene, it was obvious that the skyline is rapidly changing because of the increased use of wind turbines. In an article on the nationals news recently, it was reported that Texas has more operating wind turbines that any State in the Union; some 25K+ as compared to California’s 12K+ of operating wind turbines. What you do not see in this photo is the increased amount of large power lines strung across the country side and the billboards advertising for wind power related jobs in the region. Renewable energy is the current buzzword because it generates a lot of money for the landowner, supposedly cheaper energy, lots of jobs in the rural West and obviously, tax incentives for the turbine owners. Some of the little towns we went through were in tough shape economically and even with the increase in oil drilling activity so I will assume that these new jobs were more than welcome. I could still see the farms and ranches, along with the cattle and horses but now they sit among the wind turbines.

Leave a comment

We occasionally go to “estate sales” in the North Dallas area, although I am not sure what we are really looking for. The last time I went I bought a pair of really nice old binoculars with real glass for only $10 dollars. So I put a new neck strap on them, got an updated case which now hangs behind the seat of my truck and comes in really handy at times.  While attending an estate sale in Dallas today, we ended at a house in Highland Park in which the occupants had moved to a Nursing Home. It seems a bit strange going though a house where every item has a price marked on it because it is/was the contents of someones house or home. Walking around upstairs,  I came across a door jam in an upstairs bedroom that had a door jam in one of the rooms that used to measure the height of the grandchildren! I am thinking to myself, why did not the kids or grand kids take that jamb off of the door and keep it? Quite sad actually. fullsizeoutput_3fea

Leave a comment

IMG_1485When I was a young man I had a very exciting job on then, one of the most technologically advanced deterents of the Cold War. On the eve of Memorial Day I am reflecting what I learned all those years ago plying the Pacific one the nuclear submarine USS Gurnard SSN662 and what I found was loyalty, team work, brotherhood and the satisfaction of a job well done and of time well served. I grew up a family and community where military service was expected and all of the men in my family had served in one war or another. My father told me stories of his service in the Army Air Corp in the South Pacific in 1945 and about my great-grandfather Peter B. Gipson who rode for the Union Calvary in the Civil War, of my great uncle Clyde Gipson who died in the Battle of the Argonne Forrest two days before the Armistace and is buried in same battlefield in France, of my mother’s brother George Friesen who was the US Army during the invasion of Okinowa and uncle Albert Pfitzner, who too old to enlist, ferried bombers between the US and Europe during WWII and finally, my late father-in-law Chuck Tolbert, who was in the 2nd Marine Division and fought in those horrific battles on Guadalcanal and Saipan. Now, to carry on the family tradition, my granddaughter Julia, is now serving in the US Navy. While most of us will be sitting around a pool or tending to the BBQ, please take time to remember those for who this day is dedicated.

Leave a comment

Visiting family in East Teas today, we stopped by the Saturday morning Farmer’s Market in Winnsboro, TX. There are a number of small towns that could benefit from what this community is doing. A number of local farms have booths selling honey, vegetables, home made bread, jellies, jams, etc. They are here ever Saturday, rain or shine and even had the little cheerleaders putting on a show today. Very impressive. The local street tacos smelled especially good. One cooking tip I did pick up is the lady making the tacos – look closely and you will see that she had the onions heating up on the grill before she cuts them up.

Leave a comment

IMG_5117-Edit-2On a recent trip to San Miguel de Allende, Mexico I found a Mexico that I knew 40 years ago. What we found was a city full of life and something interesting around every corner from parades, jazz groups playing on the corner or a mariachi band serenading a soon-to -be bride and her girlfriends. People always ask if we felt safe there and I can honestly say that every evening, after dinner, we would walk back 15  to 30 minutes to the house we rented (well, one night we did take a cab because we had already walked several miles that day) with no feeling of concern or foreboding. Many a time we would approach complete strangers on the street and ask for directions and if their English was not very good, they did the best they could to direct us. The only sirens I heard were from the ambulance on the way to a hospital near where we stayed. In fact, other than traffic enforcement officers, the only armed police we saw were assisting with traffic at a holiday parade we watched one day. More on this trip in posts to come but I did want to publish this photo I took one day while walking down the street. We saw few beggars in San Miguel (actually ran into more when we were in Italy last year) and in fact, were told that the authorities were trying to discourage this practice, but we did come across a few, mostly older women or women with young children. This scene was typical in that most people tried to ignore the person asking for the holdout or simply cross the street!

Leave a comment

DoNotMolestI have probably stepped on this manhole cover a dozen times but never paid much attention until today. In downtown Glen Rose, a friend of mine pointed out the inscription about “Do Not Molest”!! Hmmm! I wonder what the intention was when someone decided to mark this over with the warning? The burning question here is how do you molest a 50 pound still manhole cover?

Leave a comment